40 year advice

  • foxbarry1
    Topic creator
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    Joined: 17.08.2017Posts: 2Ratings: 1

    I'm turning 40 later this year, and to celebrate, my wife is letting me purchase a high end bottle of scotch. I'm trying to decide between the Highland Park 40 Yr and Glenfarclas 40 Yr.  If price was not a consideration, which one should I go for?  I realize the Glenfarclas will be quite a bit less than the Highland Park, but I'm setting price aside for the time being. I'm very fond of both distilleries. Thanks in advance for your input!

  • kroman Member Joined: 16.04.2016Posts: 260Collectionkromans CollectionRatings: 21
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    @foxbarry1 


    Buy the Glenfarclas and a Laphroaig 25, which should still be cheaper than the HP:


    "Hey honey.  I was going to buy the Highland Park 40 for 2,000 dollars.  Instead I bought a Glenfarclas 40 for half that.  Seeing how I saved $1000, I figured I would reward myself with a Laphroaig 25 yr, which costs $500.  I still saved $500!"

  • Vasco Member Vasco Joined: 14.05.2017Posts: 86CollectionVasco's Closed Bottles CollectionRatings: 4
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    kroman said:

    @foxbarry1 


    Buy the Glenfarclas and a Laphroaig 25, which should still be cheaper than the HP:


    "Hey honey.  I was going to buy the Highland Park 40 for 2,000 dollars.  Instead I bought a Glenfarclas 40 for half that.  Seeing how I saved $1000, I figured I would reward myself with a Laphroaig 25 yr, which costs $500.  I still saved $500!"


    Not only that's the choice I would make, but also that would be what I would say to my wife!


  • bedlamborn Member bedlamborn Joined: 18.09.2016Posts: 611Collectionbedlamborns CollectionRatings: 21
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    @foxbarry1 

    Do you have any preference? Do you like both distilleries equally or is it one that you like more? With that much money it would be bad to buy something that one don't like.

  • horst_s Administrator horst_s Joined: 01.07.2014Posts: 507Ratings: 702
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    Both are excellent whiskies. I remember the GF as having a little more bitterness in the aftertaste.

    Kind regards, Horst Luening, Master Taster, Whisky.com
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