Perfect Glass

  • Carnell
    Topic creator
    Member
    Joined: 26.07.2016Posts: 1Ratings: 1

    Hello,

    From watching many of your videos, I have noticed you frequently alter what type of glass you use. Personally, I don't have anything apart from a wine glass to taste my whiskeys which I know isn't perfect but is better than just a normal ball glass I'd assume. So my question is, basically, what type of glass would you say is the best to drink whiskey from?

    Best,

    Carnell

  • DaFin Member Joined: 23.05.2016Posts: 101CollectionDaFins CollectionRatings: 15
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    I have a glencairn glass. It's very nice but neck is quite narrow to smell properly.
    I have a Riedel whisky tasting glass. Wider neck but too expensive to use it too often... So at the end of the day I use vintage whisky glasses.

    Unfortunately I think that Mr. Luening glass is not available to buy outside a Germany. Its nice and afordable.

  • horst_s Administrator horst_s Joined: 01.07.2014Posts: 383Ratings: 704
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    The most necessary part of a propper whisky glass is the cupa. The tulip shaped upper part of the glass, in which you fill the whisky. The narrowing top of the glass hinders the aroma vapors to get lost too fast. The 'normal' whisky tumbler is therefore the least suitable for tasting whisky.

    The size of the cupa also matters. Strong whiskies are able to fill bigger cupas. A good red wine glass might be a little big but is still good for Laphroaig, Ardbeg oder Lagavulin.

    If you have normal Speyside or Highland whiskies you might go for a smaller white wine glas. But remember, it has to have a smaller upper rim to hinder the vapors rising.

    A good choice is always a classic Sherry glass.

    Kind regards, Horst Luening, Master Taster, Whisky.com
  • Rowsdower70 Member Rowsdower70 Joined: 10.07.2016Posts: 20CollectionRowsdower70s CollectionRatings: 7
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    I looked for one with a more pronounced stem, but ended up getting some glencairn whisky glasses.

    I like them very much, but would prefer a longer stem to keep body heat away from the liquid.

    Michael Suitt
  • andyb01 Member andyb01 Joined: 21.08.2015Posts: 65Collectionandyb01s CollectionRatings: 0
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    welcome and enjoy the forum

  • horst_s Administrator horst_s Joined: 01.07.2014Posts: 383Ratings: 704
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    "Rowsdower70" wrote:
    I looked for one with a more pronounced stem, but ended up getting some glencairn whisky glasses.

    I like them very much, but would prefer a longer stem to keep body heat away from the liquid.

    Glass is a very good insulator. The Glencairn glass has a heavy bottom. Beside the cupa I prefer a decent drinking lip. The Glencairn glass has none. Therefore you have to be very carefully not to get too much into your mouth.

    I use a handmade glass to my own specifications since 18 months now. It has a litte stem, a lip, a special shaped cupa, and it is made from crystal glass. Here is the video taken during the production of one of the first prototypes.
    Kind regards, Horst Luening, Master Taster, Whisky.com
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