Whisky glasses

  • Raquel_Moeyaert
    Topic creator
    Member Raquel_Moeyaert
    Joined: 15.02.2018Posts: 1Ratings: 0

    Hello everyone!


    I'm Raquel, a student from Leuven, Belgium. For a school project, I'm assigned to do research about a new business idea: to make whisky glasses out of the recycled wood of the barrels. We want to know if there is interest in this idea, as I'm not a whisky specialist myself.


    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeAKNr7P5ab_oWhz2cDGF5vHFqzXh4y0fu8nO5TN7wwHK4a-Q/viewform?usp=sf_link



    Feel free to fill in the survey underneath. You would help me a lot, because apparently you guys are the real specialists! 



  • SlàinteMhath Member SlàinteMhath Joined: 09.10.2016Posts: 134CollectionOslo Whisky ClubRatings: 156
    , edited February 19 2018 at 4:34PM
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    For a school project, I'm assigned to do research about a new business idea: to make whisky glasses out of the recycled wood of the barrels. We want to know if there is interest in this idea, as I'm not a whisky specialist myself.


    Interesting idea! I am honest to say that I would most likely not use a Glencairn made of wood, for several reasons:


    • you don't see the colour of your dram (very useful in blind tastings, but I would not use that on a regular basis)
    • you don't see the formation of legs, if you bother to pay attention to that
    • the malt interacts with the wood: imagine you drink a Laphroaig 10 or any other peated whisky out of a wooden Glencairn. No matter how much you clean the 'glass', I am quite sure it will smell distantly peaty afterwards. I would not like to drink my floral/fruity Lowland whisky from such a glass
    • there is a chance that the (exhausted) wood might actually interact with the whisky in the glass. Retired cask wood will mostly release unpleasant tannins and could taint the whisky, if left long enough in the glass

    That's what I do. I drink, and I know things.” (Tyrion Lannister)

    >>> Whisky reviews by Slàinte Mhath <<<

  • bedlamborn Member bedlamborn Joined: 18.09.2016Posts: 611Collectionbedlamborns CollectionRatings: 21
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    @Raquel_Moeyaert 

    I would also not use a wooden glass as for the reasons @SlàinteMhath listed.


    Seeing the colour of whisky is important. Also to swirl it around in a glass to see how "oily" he whisky is.


    Then you have the cleanliness of the wood. Glass is much easier to keep hygienic.





  • bedlamborn Member bedlamborn Joined: 18.09.2016Posts: 611Collectionbedlamborns CollectionRatings: 21
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    @Raquel_Moeyaert 

    However, some people may buy something like that if it is beautifully done as an ornament.

  • hwchoy Member hwchoy Joined: 28.07.2015Posts: 462CollectionHeng Wah’s CollectionRatings: 3
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    you consider using the wood as a glencairn glass holder, say a box customised to store 6 glencairns.


    in Japan, the Pioneer audio company has used old Suntory whisky barrels to make hifi speaker box, and due to the density of the wood, the sound is pretty damn awesome.

  • DramTasticVoyage Member DramTasticVoyage Joined: 09.04.2018Posts: 205CollectionDramTasticVoyages CollectionRatings: 4
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    @Raquel_Moeyaert I dont know about a 'glass', but traditionally, Scotch Whisky was consumed out of a wooden bowl called a Quaich. There's even a picture of Prince Charles drinking Laphroaig out of one floating around online. This would probably be your best bet. Let us know how the project turns out! 

    “I’m a simple man. All I want is enough sleep for two normal men, enough whiskey for three, and enough women for four.” 

    ~Joel Rosenburg

  • horst_s Administrator horst_s Joined: 01.07.2014Posts: 507Ratings: 702
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    @DramTasticVoyage Sorry,

    this ritual drinking equipment was not used for savoring whisky but to ritually sign a contract of a young man into the army of a clan.

    Kind regards, Horst Luening, Master Taster, Whisky.com
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